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Which hospital should I choose to give me the best care for my condition?

Did you know? There are more than 5000 hospitals in the United States, just as many questions as appears when it comes to finding the right hospital for our healthcare.

The American Hospital Association conducts an annual survey of hospitals in the United States. AHA Hospital Statistics includes current and historical data on utilization, personnel, revenue, expenses, managed care contracts, community health indicators, physician models, and much more. They reported 5,534 registered hospitals in the U.S.

Can my family stay in my room with me?, Can my condition be treated here?, Will there be a doctor in the hospital to provide care if I get very sick?… and the list can continue forever. Depending on your needs, you should look for the right hospital.

The main factors to consider when choosing a hospital:

  • Identify the care you need and what your hospital has to offer;
  • Check your hospital insurance coverage and think about your personal and financial needs;
  • Find and compare hospitals based on functionality, size, location, and ownership;
  • Compare the results of certain measures of quality and talk with family members or friends about the hospitals you’re comparing;
  • Talk to your doctor and choose the hospital that’s best for you.

When comparing hospitals it’s good to take into consideration a variety of factors like functionality, size, location, and ownership. It’s important to know how the hospitals themselves function within the communities they serve. Do you want a hospital located near your home or other family members? Rural hospitals or urban hospitals? All of this must meet your needs in terms of location and other factors, like visiting hours.

Also, when it comes to size, hospitals are classified by the number of beds they have:

  • Small hospitals: fewer than 100 beds
  • Medium hospitals: 100 to 499 beds
  • Large hospitals: 500 or more beds

Now, it’s time to explore the many types of hospitals and learn about what they have to offer!

A hospital may be a single building or a number of buildings in a campus. Some are private, non-profit organization or public hospitals, owned by the government which receive government funding.

In order to offer educational opportunities for students in the healthcare field, academic medical centers serve all these medical needs for schools and universities. Ambulatory surgery centers or ASCs focus on same-day surgical care in a convenient environment that is less stressful than what many hospitals can offer. ASCs may complete different surgeries in several specialties or dedicate their services to one specialty, such as eye care or sports medicine.

Children’s hospitals offer medical treatment to children and adolescents. This means that the entire medical team has special education and training to aid in the treatment of children for a variety of acute and long-term medical needs.

Clinics are much smaller than hospitals where patients are less sick and do not stay overnight. Here you can schedule an appointment in order to verify your healthcare and obtain immediate results. Many clinics are operating as private entities and partnerships among surgeons or private physicians.

Community Hospitals play an important role in the United States health care. The American Hospital Association (AHA) defines community hospitals as “all nonfederal, short-term general, and other special hospitals.” Special hospitals include “those dedicated to obstetrics and gynecology; eye, ear, nose, and throat; rehabilitation; orthopedic; and other individually described specialty services.” Also, AHA has reported that there are 4,974 community hospitals operating in the U.S. today –  3,003 urban and 1,971 rural.

Specialty hospitals with many different specialty facilities offer specific treatments for all patients. You’ll find a variety of specialty hospitals, including:

  • Women’s hospitals
  • Children’s hospitals
  • Cardiac hospitals
  • Oncology hospitals
  • Psychiatric hospitals
  • Trauma centers
  • Cancer treatment centers

Choosing the right hospital can be a very hard task, but with all mentioned above, we consider that we made a little bit of light on this important subject. If you have any other questions regarding hospitals in the United States, feel free to contact us.

Your health is an investment, not an expense!

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What Lenox Hill Hospital means for Dr. David Samadi

What Lenox Hill Hospital means for Dr. David Samadi

Currently, Dr. David Samadi is the Chairman of Urology & Robotics Surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital.

Lenox Hill Hospital is New York State’s largest health care provider and private employer, having 13,600 physicians, more than 15,000 nurses and more than 4,725 volunteers to help deliver the care you need. Let’s see what Dr. David Samadi says about how he feels working here!

“Historically, Lennox Hill was one of the greatest programs for urology and now we’re hoping that we would bring everyone together because all the experts are all here on the one roof. I’m excited about being here at Lenox Hill because the vision from the leadership is absolutely here. We’re building a new prostate cancer center because the field of prostate cancer is always in evolution.”

It’s not the old man disease anymore! – says Dr. David Samadi at NYC Lenox Hill Hospital

Most men that come to Dr. David Samadi office at Lenox Hill, are fairly young… they’re in their 40s, 50s, sometimes 60s. It’s not the old man disease anymore so it’s not like we’re going to see people only at 70 year olds. Even though we see them occasionally, it is no longer partly their case anymore. They’re mostly aware of the disease, they’re getting screened, they talk to each other, so the level of education is surprising. More importantly, it’s the wife’s and the partners that make them come to the hospital for a PSA screening which is really fantastic.

In addition to his career as a doctor, he is the host of Sunday House call on Fox News Channel and has worked for the channel for five years. He has launched a radio program on am970, World Health News as well as a website to blog about health news.

Turn up your radio dials to WMCA AM 970 on Saturday morning between 10:00 to 11:00 a.m. for a healthy dose about prostate cancer! You’ll learn about all the medical issues that are critical in order to live longer, healthier, and happier. The idea of making this radio show came from all the women who continued to tell Dr. David Samadi that her boyfriend, her husband is not going to see a doctor.

The voice on Saturdays has one mission: to raise awareness among men at 40-60 years old to get screened and try to prevent prostate cancer before being too late. So, brew your coffee and listen to Dr. David Samadi who will be more than happy to answer your medical questions and educational issues. Also, top experts in the healthcare world weigh in on the key issues and topics in health today.

What Lenox Hill Hospital means for Dr. David Samadi

Dr. Samadi enjoys every single facet of his professional life: “It’s a very exciting life that takes me from surgery, to broadcast news, to the Emmy Awards and then, the next day, I meet people from different countries, who I’d never meet if I didn’t do what I do.”

Dr. David Samadi from Lenox Hill Hospital is a widely regarded prostate surgeon, particularly for the success of his custom SMART Surgery; the Samadi Modified Advanced Robotic Technique yields exceptional prostate surgery results. His ability to think outside the box and prioritize the individual patient’s needs in devising a treatment plan earned him a reputation for being wholly committed to helping each patient recover to the maximum of their potential.

Dr. David Samadi’s awards and recognitions

  • Best Urologist in New York, 2018
  • Castle Connolly Top Doctors 2013, 2014
  • Patient’s Choice Award 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013
  • America’s Top Doctors For Cancer 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013
  • New York Metro Area’s Top Doctors 2012, 2013
  • America’s Top Doctors 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012
  • New York Magazine Best Doctor 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015
  • Community Partner Award 2012
  • Best Regional Hospitals New York, NY Urology 2012, 2013
  • Most Compassionate Doctor 2010, 2011, 2013

Feel free to set an appointment with Dr. David Samadi at NYC Lenox Hill Hospital, here!

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Recovery: What to expect after prostate surgery

Recovery: What to expect after prostate surgery

There are several questions that come to our minds when we think about recovery after prostate surgery: How long it takes to recover after surgery? What dietary steps should I take after prostatectomy to facilitate recovery and overall prostate health?, How much pain will I have after surgery?, What are the chances my cancer will return or recur after surgery?, What other side effects or complications are possible after prostate surgery?… and many more.

It’s important to establish from the beginning of this article that there are different types of surgery for prostate cancer, each one with its consequences and benefits. The type of surgery you need for prostate cancer depends on:

  • The size of cancer and whether it has spread outside the prostate gland;
  • What the cells look like under a microscope;
  • The likely outlook for your condition (your prognosis);
  • Your general health;
  • Your symptoms.

Radical prostatectomy and robotic prostate surgery are the most common terms for prostate removal surgery. Nowadays, many surgeons use robotic or laparoscopic prostatectomy to remove a cancerous prostate, but early methods involved traditional or open surgery. Dr. David Samadi who is at the forefront of prostatectomy and prostate removal surgery has performed more than 7.000+ successful procedures using his innovative SMART technique.

Recovery: What to expect after prostate surgery

The Samadi Modified Advanced Robotic Technique (SMART) is a minimally invasive robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). The much larger incision required in open surgery means pain is greater and recovery takes longer. Known as bloodless prostate surgery, the custom SMART technique does not require opening the endopelvic fascia or cutting the dorsal vein complex. This results in no sutures and less damage to the neurovascular bundle. Lots of many positive side effects have placed SMART surgery in the first place for prostate cancer.

Let’s move on and discuss what are the possible long-term side effects of a prostate surgery. The major possible side effects of a radical prostatectomy are urinary incontinence (being unable to control urine) and erectile dysfunction (impotence; problems getting or keeping erections).

A recent survey of 247 patients treated at the University of California at Los Angeles Medical Center highlights some of these types of problems. Two years after the surgery, 60 percent of patients still had some trouble achieving or maintaining erections. Thirty months after the surgery, 37 percent still reported some loss of urinary function. Despite these setbacks, however, most patients had an upbeat attitude. More than 90 percent said their overall quality of life was back to normal within six to nine months of the surgery. Younger men proved to be especially likely to rebound quickly from the operation.

Impotence and erectile dysfunction (ED) after prostate surgery:

Expect some ED, but know that for most men it is temporary. During recovery, medications like Viagra and Cialis will help. Dr. David Samadi says restoring an enjoyable sex life after prostate cancer surgery is in part dependent on the prostate cancer treatment and choice.

Also, Kegels are a simple exercise of clenching and releasing the muscles that control your urine flow. Patients who experienced normal continence prior to surgery should regain function within 12-13 months of their surgery. There is never a 100% guarantee, but every surgeon does its best and with these advanced techniques available today, they should get everyone there.

In Dr. Samadi’s skilled hands, patients are assured superior quality of life results in both sex after prostate surgery and urinary control after prostate surgery. Following proper prostatectomy recovery guidelines, patients who experienced normal continence prior to surgery should regain function within 12-13 months.

Dr. Samadi’s prostate surgery takes just 1.5-2 hours and almost all of his patients return home the day after having a robotic prostatectomy. Around 80% of open prostatectomy patients leave the hospital within the first week.

Recovery: What to expect after prostate surgery

Surgery can be hard, but nothing compares to cancer! This disease can be an emotional journey for the entire family, but try to keep your positive attitude and don’t give up because everything will be back to normal faster than you could possibly imagine.

For any questions that you may have about the recovery after prostate cancer, you can contact Dr. David Samadi who is more than happy to answer your questions.

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The real risks of self-diagnosis

Are you suffering from something? A rash, maybe a fever or a red-eye can determine you to search on the internet for an answer. Many times people choose to search the Web to figure out what may be wrong with them, rather than to make an appointment with the doctor. With limited time and the wealth of information now available at the click of a mouse, people tend to “Google” anything. In this article we will describe when self-diagnosis is dangerous, and what you might know overtly about this danger. Here are a few truths to consider and how self-diagnosis can affect you.

What are the risks of self-diagnosis? Too often this practice leads to inaccurate, worst-case conclusions.

Getting information via the Web can also make it difficult to decide what symptoms mean in the absence of a doctor’s analysis. According to Harvard Med, Online Symptoms Checkers are wrong about 70% of the time. Similar results were found in the British Medical Journal.

While healthcare professionals acknowledge the convenience of the internet and sympathize with the struggle of some insurance plans, here are some reasons you should think twice before you search on the World Wide Web for your health problems. The risks that are associated with self-medication include:

  • The stress caused by assuming the worst about your symptoms before seeing a doctor can end up becoming an added detriment to your health.
  • The benefit of seeing a doctor is the access to trained medical experience and the personal relationship you form. The personal knowledge your doctor has about you and your medical history can’t be replaced by a website.
  • There’s also the danger of self-medicating using products with negative side effects. It’s best to consult your doctor about remedies you’d like to use because your provider will be able to inform you of the risks associated with these treatments, specific to your health and history.
  • Self-medication can be life-threatening when inaccurate dosages are taken. When you estimate your own dosage, you are at risk for taking enough to result in an accidental overdose.

When it comes to themselves, people tend to exaggerate

According to the researchers, when referring to their own symptoms people were much quicker to diagnose to a rare disease compared if they thought the symptoms were someone else’s.

Imagine the situation that you need to take a decision about someone else rather than yourself — people tend to rely more on broader information such as statistics and less on information specific to the individual, such as the symptoms he or she is having.

Consumers often fear the worst when it comes to their own health while maintaining a calm objectivity with regard to others,” said Yan Dengfeng Yan, a doctoral student at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. If you’ve got pain in the chest, you think heart attack. If a friend of a friend has the same symptoms, you say probably indigestion.

Think twice about self-diagnosing

While this article may sound like an internet ban when it comes to health information, it’s important to know that doctors do not intend to prohibit their patients from playing an active role in healthcare. It’s great that you can stay informed, but self-diagnosis is a bad thing for you and for your own mental and physical health.

Doctors are generally very enthusiastic to answer patients’ questions, so it would help if you actually trusted your doctor. If your doctor is someone whom you cannot trust, then think again about that and choose a person you fully trust. Your doctor should respect your opinion, but the discussion should be an active one. If you doubt the doctor’s diagnosis, tell him or her that you do and say why. This is much better than silently diagnosing your own syndrome.

In conclusion, self-diagnosis can have tremendous negative repercussions on the patient. For this reason, while reading is helpful and informative, it is always best to discuss your impressions with a doctor before you decide on the treatment you want.

For any questions that you may have about the prostate cancer, you can contact Dr. David Samadi who is more than happy to answer your questions.

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Study reveals that medical errors are third leading cause of death

An alarming study from 2016, conducted by Johns Hopkins patient safety experts, reveals that medical errors are responsible for the third leading cause of death in the U.S., with more than 250,000 deaths yearly.  The U.S.’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) report on the leading causes of death doesn’t take into account situations where the death of a patient was caused by a fault of the medical system. The lack of information on this topic correlates directly with the absence of medical error as a cause of death in the coding system. The classification is valid and available since 1949, when the U.S. adopted an international form based on the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) billing codes.

doctor's office

Due to the valid coding system, yearly statistics on leading causes of death have excluded medical error. Faulty medical care, wrong diagnosis, lack of procedures or of safety nets weren’t considered a potential threat to the lives of patients. The coding system was constructed in such a way as to maximize billing for medical services, rather than to collect national health statistics.

“Incidence rates for deaths directly attributable to medical care gone awry haven’t been recognized in any standardized method for collecting national statistics. […] At that time (1949), it was under-recognized that diagnostic errors, medical mistakes and the absence of safety nets could result in someone’s death, and because of that, medical errors were unintentionally excluded from national health statistics,” says Martin Makary, M.D., M.P.H., professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Lack of reporting on deaths caused by medical mistakes has developped into a dangerous situation

Reaching this conclusion was not an easy challenge for researchers at Johns Hopkins, especially for lack of coding of medical errors in the health information system. Their approach consisted in analyzing data from four independent studies, from 2000 to 2008. Using yearly hospitalization information and number of deaths, the researchers were able to arrive at the conclusion that about 9.5% of all deaths each year are caused by medical errors. The issue has passed unnoticed for years and plenty of research and funding were allocated by the Government to the causes of death reported by the CDC. In the list of life threatening causes, medical errors are less frequent than heart disease or cancer, but are more likely to occur than respiratory disease.

Fortunately or not, experts state that most medical errors are not due to poorly qualified doctors, but, rather to systemic problems: fragmented insurance networks, lack of procedures, protocols, safety nets, geographic variations (unwarranted variations) in the way physicians choose to treat the same conditions, that are not explainable by illness, medical need or the dictates of evidence-based medicine.

Reducing variability in physician practices by developing protocols that clearly set a standard for curing illnesses and delivering medicin,e can both improve quality of the health care system, lower costs and ensure higher success rates in dealing with life threatening illnesses. Resources should be invested in finding more manners of preventing medical errors.

How can you avoid being a victim of medical errors?

  • Finding the right doctor – Even though poorly trained doctors are not a direct cause of faulty medical treatment, knowing how to choose the right doctor is still paramount to receiving an efficient, safe and tested treatment. You should never choose to go to a physician with more bad reviews than good ones and should always verify his or her reputation from multiple sources.
  • Checking in the most adequate hospital – Secondly, checking the hospital you wish to get treatment or surgery in is mandatory. There are plenty of sites that rate hospitals based on mortality rate, success in treating certain types of diseases, specialized equipments, safety score. You can’t foresee all the issues that may appear, but being prepared and informed before choosing the hospital will take you a long way in receiving the treatment you need.
  • Choosing the right insurance – Last but not least, your medical insurance should cover the adequate treatment for your condition. If, for example, your doctor recommends a certain type of surgery that is not covered by your insurance, you should not bend your treatment to fit the insurance’s limitations, but rather try to expand it as to cover the recommended treatment. If not, try as much as possible to contract another insurance that is going to support the treatment you need.

 

 

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